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The Secret Benefits of Using Rainwater on Your Plants



As a free source of water, rainwater can be excellent for your plants due to its numerous benefits. Are you interested in helping your plants reach their highest potential? Let's get into some ways to feed your lovely, green friends.


1. Has fewer chemicals, minerals, and salts



A lot of water is too harsh on plants, but rainwater is a soft water that is free of salts, minerals, and chemicals. These can build up in your soil after some time which can cause harm to your plants.


2. Supplies nitrogen to make greener, happier plants



Rainwater has nitrates which allows the plant to easily absorb it. Many forms of nitrogen are not absorbable for plants, which makes it even better to use! In fact, the Smart Plant & Tree Care app has so many useful pieces of information about your plants, a free plant care calendar, and helps with identification of pests, weeds, and diseases.


3. Unlocks nutrients in soil



Rainwater has the proper amount of carbon which in turn helps unlock nutrients in the soil you plant is in. Some of which include Copper, Magnesium, Zinc, and Manganese. All of these help with the rapid growth of plants.


4. Embrace your inner witch!



If you haven’t been convinced by now that rainwater has some magical properties, I don’t know what to tell you other than rainwater has even more properties like cleansing, growth, energy and life, fertility, and revitalizing. How could you not want to embrace your inner witch by using rainwater?


5. Better yet, it's free!



Let’s be real. Buying non-tap water for your plants can get expensive (they’re worth it). But who wouldn’t want to save some money by tapping into the natural resources mother Earth provides for us for free?


It’s unbelievably easy to do too! All you need to do is grab a bucket or big container that has a wide opening, set it outside in the rain, and bring it in once it’s full. I prefer to use a wide-opening container because it collects so much more than one with a smaller opening. Once I bring the container in, I usually cover it so nothing gets in or out. Simple!



About the author



My name is Hannah Niebler and I am a senior at Marquette University in Milwaukee, WI. I am majoring in advertising and double minoring in marketing and corporate communications. I am passionate about traveling, reading, being in nature, and of course, plants! Feel free to check out my personal website here.


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